skip to main content
Menu
Back to Top

Federal health minister announces research on gender-based violence

Dec 13, 2018

SOURCE: Faculty of Health Sciences website

Offord Centre for Child Studies

Photo from left to right:

Nick Kates, Chair, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences
Terry Bennett, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences
Ellen Lipman, Director, Offord Centre for Child Studies
Harriet MacMillan (project co-lead) Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences
Andrea Gonzalez (project lead), Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences
Eric Duku, Senior Statistician, Offord Centre for Child Studies
Melissa Kimber, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences
Kathy Georgiades, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences
Susan Jack, associate professor, School of Nursing
Photo credit: Elizabeth Orr 

Two federal cabinet ministers came to McMaster University this month to announce a grant for research evaluating positive parenting initiatives, in a drive to help end gender-based violence.

Federal Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor, along with Minister of Seniors Filomena Tassi, announced that researchers of McMaster's Offord Centre for Child Studies will lead a $3.4 million study over the next five years.

It was one of three national initiatives announced as part of the Public Health Agency of Canada's Preventing Gender-Based Violence – The Health Perspective program.

The McMaster study, led by Dr. Andrea Gonzalez and Dr. Harriet MacMillan, both from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, will evaluate the effectiveness of the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program, which is a public health intervention developed in the 1980s to reduce behavioural and emotional problems in children and improve parenting practices by increasing parents' knowledge, skills and confidence. The research also includes an evaluation of the related Baby Triple P Program and will be conducted with a range of partners from Ontario and Manitoba.

Dr. Susan Jack, associate professor in the School of Nursing, will be joining the research team as a co-investigator. According to Dr. Jack, “This is a unique parenting program that can be tailored to parents with children of any age – and delivered in a variety of formats. With this project, through supporting parents, Triple P also shows tremendous promise as an intervention that can prevent child maltreatment. The primary prevention of child maltreatment is a priority public health issue because children who experience any form of abuse or neglect are at increased risk for poor physical and mental health, and for engaging in high risk behaviours, which can further contribute to poor long-term health outcomes.”

Read the original story at Faculty of Health Sciences website

Related Faculty

Posted in General | Awards | Research

© 201​​7 McMaster University  |  1280 Main Street West  |  Hamilton, Ontario ​L8S 4K1  |  905-525-​9140905-525-​9140   |  Contact Us | Terms of Use & Privacy Policy