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Diana Marginean, Alumni Profile

Diana Marginean 

Published: March 5, 2020

McMaster Degree:

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 2016

Current Position:

Therapeutic Intervention Specialist

What I love about my work:

I am involved in a number of different projects, committees and work groups. My day-to-day work is very different and I am able to use my clinical knowledge, teaching and research skills all at once. This is a very pro-social role where I am involved in a number of decision-making processes in a team format. I really enjoy that aspect and I am always working towards a goal and/or product which gives me lots of satisfaction!

 How I got here:

I graduated from McMaster in 2016 and immediately started my Master of Science in Anatomical Sciences at Queen’s University. This was a teaching-based thesis degree in which I gained more pedagogical and research skills. Combined with my clinical knowledge, this meshed well with what I have learned from my undergraduate degree. Together, both of these degrees allowed me to pursue clinical work and simultaneously tackle various academic roles in college/university settings. I started out working as a registered nurse in forensic psychiatry while teaching part-time as a professor. I was then offered the role of therapeutic intervention specialist at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton – West 5th Site given my experience with both teaching and clinical work. This position combines teaching, research and clinical knowledge to provide forensic patients with evidence-based therapeutic interventions to promote recovery while managing their risk.

Why I chose McMaster BScN:

Being from Hamilton, I was aware that McMaster’s nursing program was very highly regarded by the community, especially due to certain unique aspects of the program, such as PBL. I knew that this was where I wanted to study while also being close to my family and friends.

How my experience at McMaster helped me:

The nursing program at McMaster taught me numerous valuable skills. Being a nurse sometimes means wearing different hats and working with a variety of other health care professionals. The theoretical component taught me a good foundation for social and scientific knowledge needed when caring for patients. My clinical rotations allowed me to hone my professionalism, interprofessional collaboration, leadership and critical thinking skills. All of these formed the base of how I practice in different positions. At the end of the day, I feel grateful for being given the opportunity to present my nursing perspective at a unique level of patient care in forensic psychiatry.

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